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Public Statues and Sculpture Association

Over 100 public statues of women can be found in the UK. On the occasion of International Women’s Day, 8 March 2021, the PSSA launched a database of these multifarious sculptures representing women of achievement from past and present. The database includes many well-known figures with a range of attainments: nurses such as Edith Cavell, Florence Nightingale and Mary Seacole, the pilot Amy Johnson, writers such as Jane Austen, Virginia Woolf and George Eliot, performers such as Gracie Fields, Margot Fonteyn, Amy Winehouse and Victoria Wood, activists such as Mary Barbour, Millicent Fawcett and Emmeline Pankhurst, and countless others. These exceptional women lived full and extraordinary lives. The sculptures embody their achievements for posterity, works of art in bronze or stone to commemorate them and further our understanding of their contributions to our own lives and history. The database excludes royal personages, as well as mythological or allegorical female figures, which are in a different category from these representations of people whose successes stemmed from their own endeavours.

We would welcome contributions to the database, if you know of any other statues of women not included here, or if you wish to add information, such as further dates, about the statues on the list. Please use the form to the right. We are aware this is an evolving resource which will expand as time goes on.

There are 112 statues recorded in the database.

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    Jackie Crookstone

    Photo: Kim Traynor Wikimedia Commons

    Jackie Crookstone (1768-1797) is depicted here in a public sculpture entitled The Tranent Massacre Memorial. She was an activist associated with the riots which led to this massacre and she was one of its victims. Her bronze statue was unveiled in 1995. The figure of the boy was added later for stability.

    Sculptor: David Annand (b.1948)

    Location: Civic Square, Tranent, East Lothian, Scotland.

    Dr Helen Crummy

    Photo: Margaret Ferguson Burns Wikimedia Commons
    CC BY-SA 3.0

    Dr Helen Crummy (1920-2011) was a social activist, writer and the founder of the Craigmillar Festival Society in 1962. The bronze statues of Crummy and her son (2013-14) are mounted on a concrete base with a Jesmonite doorframe, the sculpture was unveiled on 21 March 2014. For full description and discussion see Ray McKenzie, Public Sculpture of Edinburgh, vol.1, LUP 2018, pp. 310-12.

    Sculptor: Tim Chalk (b.1955)

    Founder: Powderhall Bronze

    Concrete casting: Creagh Concrete

    Location: In front of the East Neighbour Centre, Niddrie Mains Road, Edinburgh, Scotland.

    Emily Davidson

    Photo: © the artist. Photo credit: Susan Dawson/Art UK

    Emily Davidson (1872-1913), suffragette. This steel statue depicts Davidson on hunger strike emptying the food from her bowl. The steel scrolls are inscribed: VOTES / FOR / WOMEN; and: SHE KNEW. / KNEW THEY WOULD COME / WITH A FUNNEL AND PIPE / THAT THEY WOULD COME / MOB HANDED. / RESTRAINING HER BODY BUT / STRENGTHENING HER / CONVICTION. / THEIR MISGUIDED METHODS. / SMALL BRUTAL VICTORIES / ACHIEVING THEIR GREATER / DEFEAT. / AND SHE WAS CONTENT. Commissioned by Northumberland County Council and Morpeth Town Council, the statue was unveiled on 11 September 2018.

    Sculptor: Ray Lonsdale (b.1965)

    Location: Carlisle Park, Morpeth, Northumberland.

    May Donoghue

    Photo: (c) Alison McCall womenofscotland.co.uk

    May Donoghue (1898-1958) found a decomposed mollusc in her ginger beer, which made her ill and she was diagnosed with gastroenteritis, as a result she sued the manufacturer, Stevenson, and the case was settled out of court in 1932. The internationally renowned legal case ‘Donoghue v Stevenson’ lay the foundation for the modern law on negligence and became known as ‘the snail in the bottle’ case. The statue in bronze depicts Donoghue holding her twin granddaughters on their christening day, which the sculptor intended to symbolise the scales of justice. The statue, which is sited close to the café where Donoghue found the snail in her drink, stands on a plinth decorated with hand-coloured bronze spirals which represent the snail. The memorial was erected in 2018.

    Sculptor: Mandy McIntosh

    Founder: Powderhall Bronze

    Location: Wellmeadow Street, Paisley, Scotland.

    Diana Dors

    Photo: Brian Robert Marshall Wikimedia Commons

    Diana Dors, born Diana Mary Fluck (1931-1984), film and television actress and singer. This bronze statue was unveiled in 1991. Dors was born in Old Town, Swindon and spent her early childhood there.

    Sculptor: John Clinch (1934-2001)

    Location: Shaw Ridge Leisure Park, Swindon, Wiltshire.

    Isabella Elder

    Photo: LesleyMitchell CC BY-SA 4.0

    Isabella Elder (1828-1905) was a benefactress and philanthropist, who promoted education, especially among women and was concerned with the welfare of the people of Govan. She built the Elder Free Library, a School of Domestic Economy, the Cottage Hospital and a Nurses’ Training Home. She created Elder Park, where this statue is sited. The bronze statue shows her in academic robes on a granite plinth. The statue, unveiled on 13 October 1906, was erected by public subscription. It is very rare to find a statue to a non-royal woman at this period.

    Sculptor: Archibald McFarlane Shannan (1850-1915)

    Granite cutters (to Shannan's patterns): DH & J. Newall of Dalbeattie

    Founder: J.W. Singer & Sons, Frome, Dorset

    Location: Elder Park, Govan, Glasgow, Scotland.

    George Eliot

    Photo: Creative Commons, CC BY-SA 2.0

    George Eliot (1819-1880) was the pseudonym adopted by Mary Ann Evans in order for her writing to be taken seriously and published at a time when the idea of a female author would have met with disapproval. She is a renowned novelist, her works which reflect provincial life in the Victorian era are perceptive in characterisation, displaying sharp psychological insight. She wrote several novels Middlemarch, Silas Marner and Mill on the Floss being perhaps among the best known.  She was also an essayist, journalist and poet. Eliot was born at Arbury which is near Nuneaton. This bronze statue was commissioned by the George Eliot Fellowship and unveiled on 22 March 1986. There is a second later cast of 1996 outside the George Eliot Hospital, Nuneaton, Warwickshire.

    Sculptor: John Letts (1930-2010)

    Location: Newdegate Square, Nuneaton, Warwickshire.

    George Eliot (1819-1880) was the pseudonym adopted by Mary Ann Evans in order for her writing to be taken seriously and published at a time when the idea of a female author would have met with disapproval. For more detail of her life see previous entry. This is a second later bronze cast of the statue in Newdegate Square, Nuneaton, Warwickshire, which was unveiled on 29 August 1996.

    Sculptor: John Letts (1930-2010)

    Location: George Eliot Hospital, Nuneaton, Warwickshire.

    Dame Millicent Garrett Fawcett, GBE (1847-1929) was a politician, writer and feminist, who campaigned for women’s suffrage through legal change and was not a militant. From 1897 to 1919, she led the National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies (NUWSS), which was Britain’s largest women’s rights association.

    Sculptor: Gillian Wearing CBE, RA

    Location: Parliament Square, London SW1.

    Dame Gracie Fields

    Photo: Poorlyglot Wikimedia Commons

    Dame Gracie Fields, DBE (1898-1979) was an actress, singer and comedian. This bronze statue was unveiled in September 2016 to local acclaim. Rochdale was Fields’ hometown, and although she retired to the island of Capri in Italy, she never forgot her roots and often returned.

    Sculptor: Sean Hedges-Quinn (b.1968)

    Location: Town Hall Square, Rochdale, Lancashire.