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Public Statues and Sculpture Association

Morris Singer (est. 1927)

Art foundry formed from an amalgamation of J. W. Singer and The Morris Art Bronze Foundry, operating from Dorset Road, Lambeth, until relocation to Basingstoke, Hampshire, in 1967. In 1993, the foundry was put into receivership but, despite financial problems, relocated in 1999 to a new site at nearby Lasham. In 2005, the Morris Singer name was acquired by Art Founders Ltd and, as Morris Singer Art Founders, moved to Braintree, Essex. However, by 2010 the foundry had again gone into administration and its assets were purchased by Nasser Azam, who formed a new business, Zahra Modern Art Foundries. This too went into liquidation, in 2013. Meanwhile, in 2011, John Berelowitz had set up a new incarnation of the old foundry which began trading as Morris Singer Art Foundry Ltd on the old foundry’s Lasham site. In its early years the foundry had acquired and maintained its commercial primacy by its expeditious adoption of new techniques. Most of the foundry’s work has been in bronze, although some important pieces have been cast in aluminium, e.g., Jacob Epstein’s Les Majestas, 1956, Llandaff Cathedral, and Mario Armengol’s ten 6.75m-high figures for Expo ’67 (now at Calgary, Canada). In its prime Britain’s most successful foundry, it was used by most of the country’s leading twentieth-century sculptors at one time or another.

Bibliography: T. Cavanagh, Public Sculpture of Kensington and Chelsea with Westminster South-West, Watford, 2023, pp. 16, 22, 26, 29, 31, 34, 38, 40, 41, 79, 88, 90, 235, 269, 273, 289, 307, 314, 441, 442, 456, 457, 470, 477, 478, 491; T. Cavanagh, Public Sculpture of Leicestershire and Rutland, Liverpool, 2000, pp. 138, 139, 157, 158, 198, 289, 290, 378; T. Cavanagh, Public Sculpture of Liverpool, Liverpool, 1997, pp. 5, 21, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 43, 97, 98, 108, 125, 164, 165, 226; T. Cavanagh, Public Sculpture of South London, Liverpool, 2007, pp. xvi, xvii, 25, 28, 58, 68, 69, 74, 76, 77, 81, 82, 106, 107, 177, 235, 236, 252, 282, 283, 292, 293, 313, 318, 329, 330, 358, 451; R. Cocke, Public Sculpture of Norfolk and Suffolk, Liverpool, 2013, pp. 54, 244; D.A. Cross, Public Sculpture of Lancashire and Cumbria, Liverpool, 2017, pp. 23, 28, 115, 162, 187; Daily Telegraph, 11 December 1993, p. 11; D.S. James, A Century of Statues. The history of the Morris Singer Foundry, Basingstoke, Hants, 1984; F. Lloyd et al, Public Sculpture of Outer South and West London, Liverpool, 2011, pp. 11n2, 89, 91, 97, 162n6, 205, 206, 316; R. McKenzie, Public Sculpture of Edinburgh (2 vols), Liverpool, 2018, vol. 1, pp. 85, 183, 336, 383, 390; Morris Singer Foundry website; G.T. Noszlopy, Public Sculpture of Warwickshire, Coventry & Solihull, Liverpool, 2003, pp. 124, 125, 142, 179; G.T. Noszlopy and F. Waterhouse, Public Sculpture of Staffordshire and the Black Country, Liverpool, 2005, pp. 32, 130, 186, 222; NPG British Bronze Sculpture Founders; J. Seddon et al, Public Sculpture of Sussex, Liverpool, 2014, pp. 32, 53, 77; P. Ward-Jackson, Public Sculpture of the City of London, Liverpool, 2003, pp. 95, 96, 141, 233, 259, 381, 451; P. Ward-Jackson, Public Sculpture of Historic Westminster. Volume 1, Liverpool, 2011, pp. 14, 42, 43, 50, 54, 64, 65, 86, 94, 141, 146, 149, 159, 213, 227, 300, 363, 365, 372, 374, 375, 415; D. White and E. Norman, Public Sculpture of Sheffield and South Yorkshire, Liverpool, 2015, p. 215.

Terry Cavanagh November 2022