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Public Statues and Sculpture Association

Florence Nightingale

Photo: ChrisO Wikimedia Commons

Sculptor: Arthur George Walker (1861–1939)

Architect: T.H. Wyatt (designer of pedestal)

Founder: G. Fiorini

Materials: Statue and reliefs: Bronze; Pedestal: red granite

Unveiled: 24 February 1915

Florence Nightingale

Florence Nightingale (1820-1910), social reformer, celebrated for her nursing work and management during the Crimean War. She was the founder of modern nursing and instituted nurses’ training, particularly at St. Thomas’ Hospital, London, which houses her Museum. The idea for this memorial statue was promoted by St. Thomas’ Hospital. She is depicted as the ‘Lady with the Lamp’, walking through the wards of the Scutari Hospital, with her famous lamp in her hand. The statue is bronze, on a pedestal of polished and unpolished red granite. It was unveiled on 24 February 1915 and is listed Grade II. There is a copy of this statue by Victor Tozer inside St. Thomas’ Hospital. For full description and discussion see Philip Ward-Jackson, Public Sculpture of Historic Westminster, vol. 1, LUP 2011, pp. 401-03.

Location: Waterloo Place, London SW1.

Florence Nightingale

Sculptor: Unknown

Materials: Marble

Dimensions: h.92cm. (approx.)

Florence Nightingale

Florence Nightingale (1820-1910), social reformer, celebrated for her nursing work and management during the Crimean War. She was the founder of modern nursing and instituted nurses’ training. She was active in Scotland. The director of the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary asked Nightingale to get him trained nurses, which she did. Professional nursing in Glasgow Royal Infirmary started with Rebecca Strong, a ‘Nightingale nurse’, who had trained at St. Thomas’ Hospital and became Matron of the Infirmary. Nightingale’s part in providing trained nurses for the Infirmary is acknowledged by this marble statuette of her in the foyer donated by Rebecca Strong.

Location: Foyer of north entrance of the Templeton Block, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Scotland.

Florence Nightingale

Photo: Jonathan Memel, 2018 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Sculptor: Unknown

Florence Nightingale

Florence Nightingale (1820-1910), a social reformer, was celebrated for her nursing work and management during the Crimean War. She was the founder of modern nursing and instituted nurses’ training. This statue stands above the front door of the former Nightingale Maternity Home (1904-1970s), which is now a Nightingale Macmillan Continuing Care Unit. The façade of the building is listed.

Location: Above the front door of the Nightingale Macmillan Continuing Care Unit, Trinity Street, Derby.

Florence Nightingale

Photo: Notafly, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Sculptor: Unknown

Florence Nightingale

Florence Nightingale (1820-1910) was celebrated for her nursing work during the Crimean War and was the founder of modern nursing. A statue of Nightingale features on a building of 1912 alongside historic figures from the city’s industrial past.

Location: Boots Building on the corner of East Street and St Peter's Street, Derby.

Florence Nightingale

Photo: Russ Hamer Wikimedia Commons

Sculptor: Lady Feodora Gleichen (1861-1922), the first female member of the Royal Society of British Sculptors (RBS, now RSS)

Materials: Statue: marble; Backscreen: Darley Dale stone

Erected: June 1914

Florence Nightingale

Florence Nightingale (1820-1910) was celebrated for her nursing work during the Crimean War and was the founder of modern nursing. She is depicted as the ‘Lady with the Lamp’ walking through the wards of the Scutari Hospital with her famous lamp. The commission for the Memorial was initiated by the Duke of Devonshire, President of the Governors of the Derbyshire Royal Infirmary (DRI). In 1860 the DRI was rebuilt due to high mortality rates, along lines suggested by Nightingale. Her family lived in Derbyshire after returning from Florence. The white marble statue stands on a pedestal with a backscreen of Darley Dale stone; it is listed Grade II.

Location: Outside Derbyshire Royal Infirmary, facing London Road, Derby.

Alice Nutter

Photo: Graham Demaline Wikimedia Commons

Sculptor: David Palmer of D.P.  Structures Ltd. 

Materials: Brass and Corten steel

Erected: 2012

Alice Nutter

Alice Nutter (1560-1612) was the widow of a tenant farmer, she was accused of witchcraft and hanged as a result of the Pendle witch-hunt. The statue was commissioned following a campaign by a local councillor. Made from brass and Corten steel, it was erected in 2012.

Location: Roughlee, Lancashire.

Amelia Opie

Photo: public domain

Sculptor: Z. Leon

Designer: J.P. Chaplin

Materials: Artifical stone

Amelia Opie

Amelia Opie (1769-1853) was a novelist, poet, radical and philanthropist. She was associated with the Godwin Circle and was friends with William Godwin and Mary Wollstonecraft. Her political thought was influenced by the French Revolution. In 1798, she married the artist John Opie in London and continued to write. She is best known for her novel ‘Adeline Mowbray’ (1804). When John Opie died in 1807, she returned to her father’s house in Norwich and lived close by where the statue has been erected in Opie Street. This statue, which depicts her in Quaker dress, was carved in wood and then cast in artifical stone.

Location: Above shop façade, 6 Opie Street, Norwich, Norfolk.

Ouida

Photo: Tracy Jenkins/Art UK: CC BY-NC

Sculptor: Ernest Gillick (1874—1951)

Materials: Two bronze female figures: Courage holding a sword, Sympathy holding a puppy on either side of a rectangular Portland stone column. Bronze relief profile portrait of Ouida.

Inscription: Above portrait relief: OUIDA. LOUISE DE LA RAMEE; beneath: BORN AT BURY ST EDMUNDS JANUARY 1ST 1839, DIED AT VIAREGGIO, ITALY, JANUARY 25TH 1908. HER FRIENDS HAVE ERECTED THIS FOUNTAIN IN THE PLACE OF HER BIRTH. HERE MAY GOD'S CREATURES WHOM SHE LOVED ASSUAGE HER TENDER SOUL AS THEY DRINK. CURZON OF KEDLESTON. Opposite side: THIS MEMORIAL WAS ERECTED FROM FUNDS SUBSCRIBED BY READERS OF THE DAILY MIRROR AND BY FRIENDS AND ADMIRERS IN ALL PARTS OF THE WORLD.

Unveiled: 1910 by Lady Evelyn Guinness.

Listed: Grade II

Condition: Conserved in 2018.

Ouida

Ouida, pseudonym of Maria Louise de la Ramée (1839—1908). The child of a Parisian émigré and a wine merchant’s daughter, Ouida was a popular English sensation novelist, and writer of short stories, essays and children’s books. The gender-neutral pseudonym, Ouida, with which she authored her writings, is thought to derive from her childish attempts to pronounce Louisa. An anti-vivisectionist, she was committed to animal rights and owned numerous dogs. She resided at the Langham Hotel, London from 1867, where enjoying popular success as a romantic novelist, she lived extravagantly, entertaining notable literary figures of the day. It was also the year her celebrated military novel, Under Two Flags, was published. Describing the British in Algeria and showing sympathy with the French colonists, this novel was made into a stage play and there were several film versions. In 1871, she moved to Italy where she wrote one of her best known children’s books, A Dog of Flanders (1872), which also became a film. She settled first in Florence in 1874 and then at Bagni di Lucca, finally dying in penury at Viareggio. This memorial, originally also a drinking fountain for dogs and horses, was erected through a public subscription organised by her friends and was erected in Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, her birthplace. The inscription dedicating  the memorial to Ouida was composed by Lord Curzon of Kedleston (1859—1925). For a fuller account of her life see The Victorian Web. 

Location: Vinery Road at junction with Out Westgate, Horringer Road and Petticoat Lane, Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk.

Emmeline Pankhurst

Photo: Lee Webster

Sculptor: Hazel Reeves MRSS SWA FRSA

Founder: Bronze Age London

Materials: Sculpture in bronze, surrounding meeting circle in Portland stone

Unveiled: 14 December 2018

Emmeline Pankhurst

Emmeline Pankhurst (1858-1921) was the leading political activist, who organized the UK suffragette movement. She set up the Women’s Social and Political Union, campaigning for women’s suffrage and was imprisoned many times for militant behaviour.

This bronze statue depicts Pankhurst standing on a household chair giving a speech with her arm outstretched pointing towards the Free Trade Hall, a significant building in suffragette history. Officially titled ‘Rise up Women!’ the statue has fast become known locally as ‘Our Emmeline’. It was the culmination of a five year campaign to erect a statue of a ‘woman of significance to Manchester’. Emmeline Pankhurst was the overwhelming choice of the public, winning 5,356 votes from people all over the world in an online survey. The Emmeline Pankhurst Statue Campaign was then set up which brought the project to fruition. It was unveiled on 14 December 2018, the centenary of the Representation of the People Act which gave some women the right to vote in General Elections. This was the first statue of a woman to be erected in Manchester in 100 years, the only other being the earlier one of Queen Victoria.

In 2021 ‘Rise up Women!’ won the PSSA’s prestigious Marsh Award for Excellence in Public Sculpture.

Location: St. Peter's Square, Manchester.

Emmeline Pankhurst

Photo: Fin Fahey Wikimedia Commons
CC BY-SA 2.5

Emmeline Pankhurst

Emmeline Pankhurst (1858-1921) was the political activist, who organized the UK suffragette movement. She set up the Women’s Social and Political Union, campaigning for women’s suffrage and was imprisoned many times for militant behaviour. Her statue in bronze stands on a Portland stone pedestal, the architectual setting also in Portland stone features bronze roundels, which commemorate her daughter Christabel (1880-1958) and which were added in 1959. The Emmeline Pankhurst memorial statue was unveiled on 6 March 1930. For full description and discussion see Philip Ward-Jackson, Public Sculpture of Historic Westminster, vol. 1, LUP 2011, pp. 382-84.

Location: Close to the Abingdon Street Entrance to Victoria Tower Gardens, London SW1.