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Public Statues and Sculpture Association

Sylvia Pankhurst

Sylvia Pankhurst (1882-1960), the daughter of Emmeline, was also a suffragette. She trained as an artist at the Manchester School of Art. In 1900 she won a scholarship to the Royal College of Art. She was a socialist and later a left Communist. Much of her later life was spent campaigning on behalf of Ethiopia, where she moved and died. This Corten steel statue in silhouette is one of a trio. Similar groups representing other characters are being erected in parks and open spaces as part of the Sustrans project. The people and animals represented in these sculptures are chosen by local communities to celebrate Sustrans winning a nationwide vote in 2007 to create new walking and cycling routes across the UK. The project is funded by the Big Lottery.

Location: Near Haverfield Road , Mile End Park, London E3.

Dorothy Wyndlow Pattison, ‘Sister Dora’

Photo: Derek Bennett (source: geograph.org.uk) Wikimedia Commons

Sculptor: Francis John Williamson (1833-1920)

Dorothy Wyndlow Pattison, ‘Sister Dora’

Dorothy Wyndlow Pattison (1832-1878) known as ‘Sister Dora’, was a compassionate Anglican nun and nurse with ideals of thrift and hard work. She arrived in Walsall in 1865 and developed a close tie with the local community. Her devotion to her patients became legendary. Always at hand in time of crisis, she nursed through a smallpox epidemic, horrific factory accidents and a pit disaster. She turned the local hospital into a national model of economic efficiency. When she died, thousands lined Bridge Street to pay their respects. She is renowned as the first woman, apart from members of the royal family, to be commemorated in a full-size statue. The original sculpture in Sicilian marble was unveiled in October 1886, but in 1956 money was raised by public subscription to replace the very weathered marble with a bronze cast, which stands on a polished Peterhead granite pedestal with bronze reliefs. A plaster cast of the statue, which formerly stood in the Council House foyer in Lichfield Street, was moved in 2010 and installed at Walsall Manor Hospital.

Location: The Bridge, Walsall, West Midlands.

Anna Pavlova

Photo: Acabashi Wikimedia Commons

Anna Pavlova

Anna Pavlova (1881-1931) was a celebrated Russian prima ballerina and the principal artist of the Imperial Russian Ballet. Her signature role was The Dying Swan, which she performed thousands of times. Her statue on top of the cupola of the Victoria Palace Theatre was commissioned by the owner Sir Alfred Butt (1878-1962), possibly to the design of architect Frank Matcham (1854-1920). Pavlova appeared on stage there, when the theatre first opened in 1911. The original statue was taken down during WWII and lost. The present gilded bronze figure is a replica based on photographs of the original. It was erected in June 2006.

Location: Victoria Palace Theatre, Victoria Street, London SW1.

Dolly Peel

Photo: Jim Field Wikimedia Commons

Dolly Peel

Dolly Peel (1782-1857) was a South Shields fishwife and smuggler in the 1800s, who protected sailors from the press gangs. Her activities were discovered, but she was pardoned and given work nursing sick sailors. She became a local heroine and later published poetry. The statue was commissioned by her great-great-great grandson Reginald Peel and was based on a surviving photograph.  Made of ciment fondu, the statue was unveiled in April 1987 by Councillor Gladys Hobson.

Location: River Drive near the junction with Palatine Street, facing the river Tyne, South Shields, Tyne and Wear.

Dame Mary Peters

Photo: © Copyright Albert Bridge  CC BY-SA 2.0

Dame Mary Peters

Lady Mary Peters (b. 1945) was a pentathlete and shot putter, who represented Northern Ireland at every Commonwealth Games 1958-74, winning two gold medals for the pentathlon and a silver for the shot put. In 1972 she was awarded  BBC Sports Personality of the Year, having won Britain’s only athletics gold medal at the Munich Olympics. Her bronze statue, erected at the athletics track which was created in her name, shows Peters giving her characteristic victory wave to the crowd. It was unveiled in June 2013.

Location: Mary Peters Track, Upper Malone Road, Belfast, Northern Ireland.

Isabelle ‘Ella’ Pirrie DCS

Photo: Ross Wikimedia Commons

Isabelle ‘Ella’ Pirrie DCS

Isabelle ‘Ella’ Pirrie DCS (1857-1929) having trained with Florence Nightingale, in 1883 Pirrie became the first nurse in the Belfast Union Workhouse (now Belfast City Hospital), where she established a nursing school. She later became matron of the Deaconess Hospital in Edinburgh (1894-1914), a training school for nurses. The bronze statue shows her holding a letter from Florence Nightingale dated 1 October 1885, which reads ‘…You have already done great things. You must be the nucleus of hope for a goodly future of trained nursing staff at Belfast Infirmary …’. The statue was erected in 2007.

Location: Belfast City Hospital, Belfast, Northern Ireland.

Princess Pocahontas

Photo: Matt Statter Wikimedia Commons

Princess Pocahontas

Princess Pocahontas (c.1596-1617) was a Native American, associated with the colonial settlement at Jamestown, Virginia. She married tobacco planter, Jon Rolfe. They visited England, where she became a celebrity, but died at Gravesend on the return journey. This bronze statue, cast from the original by William Ordways Partridge of 1922 in Jamestown, was presented to the British people by the Governor of Virginia and unveiled in 1958. It is listed Grade II.

Location: St. George's Churchyard, Church Street, Gravesend, Kent.

Dorothy Round

Photo: Elliott Brown Wikimedia Commons CC BY-SA2.0

Sculptor: John McKenna (b.1964)

Designer: Steve Field (b.1954)

Materials: Bronze

Unveiled: 20 September 2013 by Dorothy Round's daughter

Dorothy Round

Dorothy Round (1909-1982) (known as Mrs D.L. Little after her marriage) was a champion tennis player, winning the singles title at Wimbledon in 1934 (when she was ranked no.1 in the world) and in 1937. She also won the Australian singles in 1935 and three mixed doubles titles at Wimbledon. This life-size bronze statue, unveiled by her daughter on 20 September 2013, is in her home town.

Location: Priory Park, Dudley, West Midlands.

Enriqueta Augustina Rylands

Photo: Jacqueline Banerjee Victorian web.

Sculptor: John Cassidy (1860-1939)

Materials: Seravezza marble

Unveiled: 9 December 1907

Enriqueta Augustina Rylands

Enriqueta Augustina Rylands (1843-1908), a philanthropist, was the third wife of the wealthy cotton manufacturer, John Rylands. After his death, she spent 20 years and around two million pounds of his fortune building the John Rylands Library in his memory. She loved architecture, art and books. The Library was designed at her request by the architect, Basil Champney (1842-1935). It rivalled the university libraries of Oxford and Cambridge. When it was inaugurated on 6 October 1899, the anniversary of her marriage, the Manchester Corporation gave her the Freedom of the City. She was the first woman to receive this honour. Mrs Rylands commissioned a Seravezza marble statue of her husband for the Reading Room from the sculptor, John Cassidy in 1894, which was installed when the Library opened. Supporters of the Library commissioned her statue from the same sculptor, also in Seravezza marble, as a pair to her husband’s. This stands at the other end of the Library facing him and was unveiled on 9 December 1907, shortly before her death.

Location: Reading Room, John Rylands Library, Manchester.

Enriqueta Augustina Rylands

Photo: John Rylands Research Institute and Library.

Sculptor: John Cassidy (1860-1939)

Materials: Bronze

Dimensions: h.95cm.

Signed and dated: John Cassidy
1905

Enriqueta Augustina Rylands

Enriqueta Augustina Rylands (1843-1908), a philanthropist, was the third wife of the wealthy cotton manufacturer, John Rylands. After his death, she spent 20 years and around two million pounds of his fortune building the John Rylands Library in his memory. For further details see previous entry. This bronze statuette (h.95cm.) was commissioned by the supporters of the Library. Signed and dated 1905 by the sculptor, John Cassidy, this cast is a reduction of the larger statue. Previously displayed on the fourth floor of the Library, this bronze is now exhibited in the Library foyer.

Location: Foyer opposite the Reception Desk, John Rylands Library, Manchester.